Different Kinds of German Shepherd

Different Kinds of German Shepherd

German Shepherds are one of the most recognizable breeds in the United States and one of the most popular dog breeds in the entire world.

Did you know that there are many kinds of German Shepherds? This is a little known fact about them. There are actually a lot more to these different kinds of German Shepherds than their fur color.

Let’s take a look at the different kinds of German Shepherds below and differentiate them from one another.

American show lines

American show lines German Shepherds were popularized in the early 70’s thanks to their obedience and affectionate behavior. They are outstandingly agile and are known to have a great work ethic.

Their narrow head and pointed ears make them easily distinguishable from other kinds of German Shepherd.

American Show lines German Shepherds make for great companions and family pets. They are less physically demanding when you compare them to other dog breeds and even other German Shepherd kinds.

Most well-bred American show lines German Shepherds are rather laid back but still sensitive to those that care for them.

West German show lines

These German Shepherds have a reputation for being known as one of the most aesthetically pleasing dog breeds in the world. They are more than just a pretty face, though.

They are almost comparable to the working lines of German Shepherds thanks to their active tendencies. You must be willing to do a lot of exercise since exercising them may be physically demanding especially if you are a novice dog owner.

West German Show line German Shepherds are primarily cared for by families that do not have a lot of outside responsibilities which is why they make great barn guards and farm patrollers. You will most likely find a farmer that has one of these.

Czech working lines

These German Shepherds were primarily used as companions for patrol officers in border patrol work. The Czech patrol is dominated by many German Shepherds which is where the use of dogs as companions for military and police personnel was first popularized.

Czech Working lines German Shepherds have an amazing work drive and tend to be a lot more intense than other German Shepherds. This work drive is paired with lots of agility and energy which is why Czech Working lines German Shepherds make great working dogs.

West German working lines

These German Shepherds are known to be temperament and have an excellent working ability. West German working lines German Shepherds are the closest to the ones bred by Max von Stephanitz. They are known to exceed expectations when put in different sporting situations and real life working situations like search and rescue or patrolling.

West German working lines German Shepherds have a strong work drive. They only settle down when they get tired and will most likely not stop until they actually accomplish a task. They are easy to train and handle which is why they make a great pet for an active family even with a novice handler.

East German working lines

This kind of German Shepherd was maintained until after the end of the Second World War. They were established characters when it comes to patrolling and chasing around hostiles which is why they can prove to be a little aggravated already with little provocation.

They were closely bred for 40 years which is why they look a lot more distinct when compared to other kinds of German Shepherd.

East German working lines German Shepherds have a strong work ethic for the most part and require a lot of mental and physical stimulation from a very experienced owner. They get really restless and impatient when they are not doing anything which makes for potentially dangerous situations for novice dog owners.

Conclusion

There are a lot of different kinds of German Shepherds which is why even if you choose this particular breed, you still have to choose a specific kind as well. There are many differences in their behavior and tendencies so if you want to learn more about them, then we suggest reading the German Shepherd Handbook now.

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